Endometriosis and Planning for the Future - Part 2

Last updated: January 2020

Read Part 1 here

In this final installment of their series on endometriosis and planning for the future, Jessica and Chris dive into what to consider when planning for future hopes and dreams.

How do you account for endometriosis when planning for the future?

From Jess: Well, in terms of long-term plans, I think it’s just ingrained in me now – I don’t have to consciously think about endometriosis and what that means. I just automatically look to create a life and plans that help to keep me well.

When it comes to mid-term plans like holidays, I will actually look ahead and see if my app can predict when my period will come, and I’ll avoid booking around then or will ensure I’m not flying when I’m due on. When it comes to traveling, as in going away for a few months, I do tend to ensure I know where the hospitals are and I’ll also research food, etc. to ensure I can eat for endometriosis.

For short-term plans, like my working week, I actually plan all of my work around my period. If I’m ovulating, I know that I’ll have more energy and will be more sociable, so I tend to book in all my podcast interviews around then. As I near my period, I know I’m much better off alone and I’ll need more focus time to concentrate as I’m more likely to be tired. Chris mentions this later, but I do have an emergency fund equal to three months income.

From Chris: I think proximity to a specialist hospital is something that I have been thinking about recently. We plan on moving house again soon, so access to a good hospital and preferably an endometriosis specialist center has to be taken in to consideration.

Also, having an emergency fund is important - some cash in the bank in case Jess needs surgery and has to take time off, or we need to pay for a lot of cabs while she is recovering, something to cover those expenses and help them not hit us too hard financially when they arise.

What advice to you have for other couples regarding making future plans with endometriosis?

From Jess: I think it depends what you want. Planning ahead is always helpful as most of the time, we get distracted by life if we don’t know what we’re aiming for, and we can find ourselves five years down the line still not where we want to be. I think this can be even more true with endometriosis – you never really know where this disease will take you in life!

So, get really clear with yourself about what you want, and then get honest with yourself about how endo might affect that. It’s not about stopping your dreams because you think they’re unrealistic, it’s about making adjustments if necessary.

I think getting stable financially is really important too. This doesn’t mean you need loads of money, but being in control of your money is so helpful.

From Chris: As above, consider the location of good hospitals when you move house. Make sure you don’t have hours of driving to do every time you need to go to the hospital as, especially after a surgery, this could be difficult.

Also, if you plan to have children, start gathering information and looking in to options now. Endometriosis can have an effect on fertility and even though this is by no means certain, it's important you know what challenges you might face moving forward.

I’d also like to reassure the reader that whatever plans you have for the future, with a little resourcefulness and flexibility, you’ll be able to overcome the challenges of endometriosis and live the life you want to. Jess and I are doing it, and so can you.

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