Anyone Can Benefit from Therapy

The thought of going into an office, lying on a couch, and telling someone your deepest darkest secrets, your traumas, might terrify some people. Thankfully, therapy has changed over the decades. Clients can now sit in comfortable chairs and therapists do not insist that you spill all your deepest darkest secrets at once. For most people, therapy is a good and healthy experience.

My fear was unfounded

I was terrified when I first went to therapy. What were they going to ask? Were they going to judge me for the things I shared? My fears were quickly allayed. I have never felt judged and I have been going to therapy off and on since 2009. In my experience, therapists usually let their clients steer the sessions.

What to expect in the first appointment

In the first few sessions, therapists often spend time getting to know their clients, asking questions about family, friends, and relationships. They do this so they have an understanding of who is who in the future, to avoid interrupting constantly asking, “Now, who is that?” They also might ask generally what topics you are there to discuss. If you are just there prophylactically, for preventive reasons, that’s absolutely okay. You can benefit from therapy even if you feel okay and have nothing specific to talk about. If I have nothing special to discuss, my current therapist asks about my week. That question usually leads us down a productive path.

Therapists have seen and heard it all

No matter why you are going to therapy, you might feel some embarrassment, especially when discussing things you might not even feel comfortable sharing with your closest friends. That is okay. Trust me when I say therapists have seen and heard everything. There is nothing you can tell them that will shock or surprise them. On the off chance that they are surprised, you will never know, because they have the most amazing poker faces. So, please, do not be afraid to share everything with your therapist. Your therapist will listen and help you get through whatever you are dealing with.

Therapy is not a lifelong commitment

People are often scared to go to therapy because they don’t want to be stuck going two times a week for the foreseeable future. But that’s the beauty of therapy. You can go when you need to and not go when things are going well. Since the pandemic, most therapists offer virtual appointments. So, you don’t even have to leave your home to have therapy.

Why you should get help before problems worsen

So many couples and individuals wait until there are giant problems in their marriages or their lives before seeing therapists. By then, the issues are more complicated and therapy becomes a necessity, making it feel so much harder. You don’t have to be in a crisis to seek therapy. Instead, put your fears aside and take the plunge, knowing you can stop whenever you want to.

What are your experiences?

Have you ever gone to therapy to help you cope with endometriosis or for other reasons? Have you avoided therapy out of fear? Please feel free to share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below.

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Endometriosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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