How We’re Eating for Endometriosis This Christmas

Jessica has endometriosis and is an endometriosis health coach, and Chris is her partner.

Christmas is a time when quite naturally, we all tend to eat a bit more and indulge our sweet tooth more than usual. Over the years, we’ve been working to make our Christmas food more and more endo friendly, so I can avoid a flare up.

This year I’ve really explored the world of sugar-free baking and sugar-free treats with the use of 100% dark chocolate, stevia, monk front and chicory root and so we’re both excited to create an array of treats without the sugar this Christmas. This is especially important as I’m due on my period on Boxing Day and sugar is without a doubt the main food group that worsens my pain.

Here’s an overview of the menu and considerations we’ve made for this year!

Breakfast

Jessica: Gone are the days when I could freely eat chocolate on Christmas day morning. Sure, I could definitely eat sugar free chocolate but too much cacao triggers my histamine-induced racing heart and palpitations, so I’d rather avoid that on Christmas morning!

Chris and I love nothing more than treating ourselves to a cinnamon bun every once in a while, but due to the gluten, dairy and sugar, it’s a very rare occasion. So instead of totally going without these delights, we’re making some adaptions.

Chris: To make an more endo-friendly cinnamon bun, we’ll use spelt flour as it has a lower gluten content than regular wheat flour. We’ll also substitute sugar for a sugar substitute such as granulated stevia or Zusto, which is a sugar substitute made from corn and chicory fibre that bakes really well.

We also make pretty delicious patisserie-style almond croissants, which can be made gluten free using pre-packaged gluten free croissants, and sugar-free inulin syrup in place of the rum-infused syrup.

Christmas Dinner

Jessica: We know that a spike in blood sugar raises inflammation, so whilst I made an exception for breakfast with the refined flour (which can raise blood sugar), I really want to focus on Christmas dinner being more blood sugar friendly.

That means following the basic rules of having a plate consisting of 50% veggies, 25% protein and the final 25% being split between complex carbs and healthy fats.

Chris: Our unusual but delicious centerpiece is a sausage stuffing that is so delicious that it fills the gap left by any roast meat. It’s high in protein from the nuts and pea protein that binds it, and it’s packed full of herbs and vegetables from the veggie sausages.

We roast potatoes in odorless coconut oil rather than goose fat, with a little gluten-free flour to crisp up the outside. The inulin syrup we used in the croissants comes in useful again to replace the maple syrup on glazed carrots and parsnips, and the rest of the plate is made up of sprouts, cabbage and low starch veg. Having a plate full of cruciferous vegetables is great for healthy estrogen elimination.

Dessert and Sweet Treats

Jessica: Desserts are quite commonly rich in two of my biggest triggers: sugar and dairy. Thanks to lockdown, I’ve perfected a sugar free ice cream base and a wonderful sugar free cake base, which we’re going to adapt for Christmas.

Chris: We’re going to make smaller individual desserts this year, to save us indulging on a huge cake between two people. Again, we’ll use the sugar substitutes we used in the morning, and almond flour to make the cakes gluten free. To go with the desserts, there will be cream and ice cream made from cashews – high in fat to help balance the sugars on the plate and help with stabilizing blood sugar after the meal.

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